Sometimes the hardest story to tell is your own. Writing your own resume is hard for most experienced adults! You have the added challenge of learning who you are first, and then putting it on paper. No small feat for recent grads. Usually what I see are resumes that either include everything but the kitchen sink, or barely anything that’s employer-worthy.

4) Travel Expenses -With gas prices today, even an interview nearby home costs some money, and depending on your range of your career campaign, the cost of travel may increase. Don’t discount spending your own money for travel to get the right position.

Offer any networking contacts that may benefit them. By helping them to network you are opening up many more opportunities for them, and helping them in a very productive way.

Start with yourself. Look at your interests, you strengths, your weaknesses. Try to find careers that correspond to those. Consider a professional assessment to help think about them in a more systematic manner. If you are in school, check with your guidance counselor, career center, or other qualified professional.

Al Horford. This may be an unconventional pick, but all one must do is look at the Hawks’ record this season. Moreover, look at the team’s record since they drafted Horford. What was once a miserably unsuccessful franchise just a few short years ago is now one of the strongest teams in the Eastern Conference. What’s the difference, you ask? The presence of Horford, one of the best defensive players in the game.

If you are looking to get a job where you can express creativity, spend your senior year creating an online portfolio. Get this portfolio up and running so that you can add that to your resume for employers to see.

After you sign up for a checking account, make sure that you do not leave without getting the free checks that most establishments offer. Do not pay for extras. You may be surprised at how few checks you will use over the course of your four years in college. It is simple enough to get more if you need them, but you don’t want to waste money if at all possible.

A broad resume — that tells the person with whom you’re meeting the most about you. You’ll use this for about half of your job conversations. It’s best for a general conversation where there’s no job opening at stake, and the person with whom you’re talking doesn’t work in one of your career fields of interest.