Do I think you should spend your every waking moment looking for a job? No way. (In fact, in case you haven’t noticed, I’m a big advocate of HIRING SOMEONE – ME(!) – to help you with your materials and your search so you know you are starting way ahead of the pack. Save your time, money and sanity!) Yes, take a break, but not a 3-week break! Don’t be a job seeker-a-holic, but don’t step out of the frey if you want to be competitive in today’s tough economic times.

Your old college or university’s career center is equipped to help more than just recent grads. They might be able to help you find some job leads, even if it’s been years since you graduated.

Update your contact information with email and phone Only use contact information that is completely separate from your companies contact information.

If you think you might change your mind or if you simply have no clue as to what major to choose, enroll in a college with a variety of solid programs of study. Doing so will ensure that you don’t have to change universities if you decide to change majors.

So here are some keys to help you find a rehab therapist job. Many of them apply to finding a job in any field, with a few tweaks for the rehab therapist.

Get suited up. But forget about buying retail. Portland has great options in second-hand clothing. Goodwill, Salvation Army, and a score of consignment and other second-hand stores abound. If finances are too tight, check out Dress for Success, the southern Maine Chapter.

If you are looking to get a job where you can express creativity, spend your senior year creating an online portfolio. Get this portfolio up and running so that you can add that to your resume for employers to see.

All across the country students are limited to entry level jobs because they lack experience. Employers look for resumes that show internship, volunteer opportunities or jobs that relate to a major. Most students show experience but it is not experience in their career.